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>>> we are following some breaking news. as cbs just told you former south african president nelson mandela has passed away. >> it is a sad day but a day unfortunately we knew was coming as nelson mandela had been in failing health for some time and the news came from the current south african president jacob zuma who said and i quote here, "he is resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father." you're looking at some images of nelson mandela through the years really considered to be the father of modern south africa, a great unifier of both white and black south africans, spent 27 years as a political prisoner and in spite of that rose to become the president of the nation and as you can hear, people talk about his generous spirit. >> truly a symbol of peace and forgiveness as well. we have heard reports that he was with family and friends at his house last night when he passed away. some close family friends were also in johannesburg in south africa when he did. >> vinita nair has a look back at nelson mandela's life and legacy. >>
edition of "andrea mitchell reports," celebrating the life of nelson mandela. >> i stand here before you not as a profit but as humble servant of you, the people. >> a giant among then, activist, prisoner, leader, a president, a founding father. for the legions who revered him simple madiba. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. >> my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> by the power of his example demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choorse, how we will respond injustices, grievances, sorrows and tragedies that afflict all of human kind. >> he was an inspiration to generations of freedom fighters. >> we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you. you inspired us. i said new york city, mr. mandela, you inspired us. >> we entered into a covenant, which i billed to society in which all, both black and white, will be able to walk tall w
for watching. we appreciate your ♪ >>> this is "world news." tonight nelson mandela, his struggle and strength healed a nation and changed a world. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> from a tiny prison cell, he rallied millions against racism and injustice. his long walk to freedom a beacon of hope for generations. >> nothing will stop our date with destiny. >> tonight, the world mourns the passing of an icon. >>> and a good evening to al you. we welcome you to a special edition of "world news," beginning with breaking news. a titan of the century has died. nelson mandela, the man who taught the modern world you can transform anger into hope. he was 95 and it's not that his death was a surprise but his life continues to astonish us in a master class in living the possibility of a better world. he spent 27 years in prison for his belief in freedom, equality and emerged with a message of generosity toward his oppressors. we have reaction from around the world tonight. first "good morning america" anger robin roberts who has traveled to south afri
about the inspirations that were set into motion and fulfilled on so many levels by nelson mandela, and how that inspiration needs to carry on well beyond today. here's the president. >> nelson mandela lived for that ideal and made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. today he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will ever share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> that last line there from president obama, he belongs to the ages, reminiscent of another famous quote, which was after president lincoln was declared dead, standing coming forward who reportedly said, "now he belongs to the ages." just one more sign of the significance of the passing of nelson mandela. nowhere perhaps more felt, though, then in his native south africa. president jacob zuma was the one to break the news this afternoon. let's listen in. freedom andled for healing. he had the respect of the world. his humility, his compassion, and his humanity gained him their l
of the day. we'll talk about that coming up. >>> now getting back to the life of nelson mandela, south africa's president announced that news just a few hours ago. >> it comes following mandela's long battle with lung problems that have plagued him for months now. danielle nottingham has the story. >> reporter: former president bill clinton released a statement saying today the world has lost one of its most important leaders and one of its finest human beings. south africans gather near nelson mandela's home to remember the man that led their country into a new era. he passed away after a long illness that left him bedridden for several months. >> we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family in 1918 and grew up to become a lawyer, but in the '50s and '60s he became active in the movement against apartheid in south africa. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. after 27 years in prison mandela was freed. >> i cherish the idea of a new south
are mourning the loss of nelson mandela. and washington dc, people gathered with candles outside the embassy where a statue of mandela stands. >> it is now morning in south africa. some people have been paying tribute outside his home since his death was announced late thursday night. others are just waking up the to the news there. mandela is credited with transforming a country. >> tonight, danielle nottingham has more on the passing of this great leader. >> reporter: south africans gathered in the predawn darkness to sing the praises of their former president, nelson mandela who died just hours earlier at the age of 95. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison for crimes against the government, mandela was freed in 1990. in 1994, he became the country's first black president. >> he built a genuine multiracial democracy in south africa. when he could have had a one party state and shut everyone else out. when he could have had the politics of resentment, he chose the politics of inclusion. >> reporter: years later, he bec
to nelson mandela, tonight, on "washington week." the stock market bounces back, the unemployment rate hits a five-year low, the affordable care act may be turning the corner. >> this law is working and will future.o the gwen: is it all too good to be true? >> while the white house wants to claim that healthcare.gov is now working, we know that obamacare is still plagued with problems. gwen: outside washington, detroit is headed into bankruptcy, pensions are disappearing and low wage workers say they're being left out. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country. gwen: and -- we remember nelson mandela. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. gwen: covering the week, jackie calmes of the "new york times," michael fletcher of "the washington post," and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live, from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- we know inw-up, cyber world
is headed east. >> south africa will honor nelson mandela with more than a week of memorial events. he died at the age of 95. his countrymen are grieving, but many are using his passing to celebrate a life well lived. we have the story now from johannesburg. >> reporter: it's the night of chanting for the man who they call father. father of the nation being celebrated for incredible grace, the man who transcended class and race. for south africans the day is for morning. mandiba, he was the father of the nation is it. >> they would come together and mourn. >> he might have been sicked for a long time, but people here are shot. they're mourning for their leader. >> we knew that this would come because of mandiba's age there is a huge sense of loss you. >> young and old, white and black, remembered his grace, his generosity of spirit. >> i'm just glad he did all he did for us. hopefully we continue the legacy he left. >> reporter: a legacy of forgiveness and reconciliation that this country is deeply missing. over the next ten days mandela's body will lie instate. mandela always said that a m
, nelson mandela i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. contributions will continue until 10:00 p.m.. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela taking place in westminster hall on thursday the 12th of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the service and johannesburg. and his royal highness, the prince of wales, will be there for the funeral. his family, his friends, and the millions in south africa, and those around the world, our morning and today. mourning him today. though humanity bears ever upwards, away from brutality. but it is not so. progress is not just handed down. it is one through struggle -- struggle.h nelson mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. the evil ofr forget apartheid and its affect. separate buses, separate schools, and e
am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to his own country but all over the world. the long-time freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba as he was known sacrificed decades of his own life in prison in an effort to win his countrymen freedom from the bonds of apartheid. mourning and tributes as you might imagine pouring in throughout the night from harlem to his hometown of johannesburg, south africa. it is all for a man who was prepared, as you heard, to die to bring democracy to a country where for so long it wa
nelson mandela, the south african freedom fighter has been canonized for his accomplishments. did you realize the u.s. had him on a terrorist watch list until 2008? >>> good afternoon. welcome to "the lead." we begin with the national lead. it's like most of the country is living inside a flu medicine commercial right now. brutally cold weather has descended upon most of the nation, bringing a deadly ice storm sweeping from texas to new york. nearly 2,000 flights have been canceled, many of them going to or from the dallas-ft. worth airport. it's colder in dallas right now than it is in anchorage, alaska. authorities fear that no amount of shoveling or salting will make the streets safe enough for the dallas marathon or holiday parades so officials decided to cancel both of those events this weekend. at least four deaths are blamed on this massive storm. two of them in oklahoma, where the roads are like skating rinks, highway patrol officers there have responded to more than 100 weather related crashes just since yesterday morning. there are fears that this ice storm could be catastro
. >>> south african mourners are holding vigils and memorials for nelson mandela continues. and this marijuana ingredient is bringing hundreds of families with epileptic children to colorado. >> we'll start with the legacy of nelson mandela. >> part of successful white government that kept nelson mandela in jail and then served for mandela. as u.s. ambassador and then foreign minister it was his task to defend the continued imprisonment of nelson mandela and other political opponent. but privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> i submitted a memorandum, due to the effect that mr. mandela ought to be released that we're bringing a bigger martyr of him every day he stays in prison, and that his international aclaim and status would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any more. unfortunately, it continued on. >> here we have a man 27 years in prison. the day he was released he displayed the acumen and attitude of an american who has been a president before. amazing. amazing what insight he had into the minds of people. and for that matter into world affair
and bitter battle against apartheid. streets tonight have been a place of celebration for the life of nelson mandela. much more on that in a few moments. >>> but our top story tonight comes from california, where an 85-year-old american man is home after a seven-week ordeal as a prisoner in north korea. the end of a tense standoff came suddenly, the north korean government saying merrill newman, a korean war vet with a heart condition was released for humanitarian reasons. nbc's mike taibbi is in palo alto with more for us. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. the north korean officers say they deported merrill newman, others say he was freed after a detention that never should have happened. bottom line, the 85-year-old the ex-marine for a trip that lasted much longer than it should have is home. it happened quickly without any prior announcement, the flight from pyongyang to beijing, and merrill newman finally able to speak freely. >> i'm very glad to be on my way home. >> reporter: and then after a direct flight to san francisco, american soil. >> it's been a great, great home
declared its own defense zone. >>> around the world, remembering nelson mandela. brace yourself. things like this are happening across the country today. >> increasing tensions in asia, south korea has declared an expanded air defense zone. one announced by china last month. al jazeera's hear faucett reports. >> south korea's announcement may be about invisible lines in the air but they extend to areas of land and sea. a submerged rocky reef, under its very obvious de facto control. these strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seoul as part of their exclusive economic zones. now south korea has asserted its rights above. >> the new korean air space defense accommodation zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight region. does not overlap with neighboring countries. over i.odo's waters. >> seoul's move comes two weeks after china's zone of south korea and japan. the new zone extends larger into the larger chinese one and also of that and japan. requiring foreign aircraft to identify themselves,. >> translator: we believe this will not significantly imp
tensions on the nation. n'beating in the major winter storm. >> remebering nelson mandela today marks the beginning of a week of commemoration. south afte afterallan how are pg nelson mandela and his legacy. >> well rochelle they are celebrating nelson mandela with song and chanting and fraser prd laughter. it's been an open air festival all day long. earlier today we went to a huge catholic church not too far from here celebrating his 50th anniversary and celebrates the life of one of the world's great statesmen. attendance today mor more than a thousand. >> the sounds of sowest tweto an that is not just another sunday the congregation of the largeste church celebrates mandela in song and prayer. as similar services are held across south africa in a day of reflex. reflection. we gather here to thank god for his life and we thank god for the blessings that he bestowed on the life of ma d ma. madiba. >> the police were sending tear gas inside of the church to get him out. it was very bad. father sebastian show us the bullet holes from a decade ago. we could have filled them saul
.t.o.'s body and soul. tributes paid to nelson mandela. the issue of subsidies affects 600 million who rely on discounted grain and other agricultural product to survive. the government itself wants to make sure. i made that clear before going to bali that they would not move. they have to enshrine in law that people under the poverty level would be guaranteed a certain amount of grain per month. it's part of the coalition policy and the jewel in the crown of what they achieved in this particular parliament. failing to exempt india and others would have been disaster for any government. we are heading to a general election. parliament will be dissolved and a general election amount. the upa government will go to the masses and say, "this is what we have done for you." they are hoping that the masses will react to that knowing that the subsidy issue will be left indefinitely until a permanent solution can be found, one that india agreed to. >> a philippine congressman joins me from oz low. this is the first deal the world trade organization has completed in 18 years. was it worth the wait? >
york. nelson mandela was 96 years old and will live forever in the world. >> our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. he passed on peacefully in the company of his family around 2050 on the 5th of december, 2013. he is now resting. he's now at peace. >> this is a fox news alert. former south african president, a hero, nelson mandela who's died at his johannes burg. his life is a remarkable inspiration to millions around the world. he spent 27 years in jail vowing to fight oppression, never giving up, never knowing he would get out of jail. when he finally did he became president of the nation that had imprisoned him vowing to love those that hated him eventually sharing the nobel peace price for the man who once was his oppressor. president barack obama spoke about mandela shortly after the world received the munews. >> he achieved more than expected from any man. he's gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us
run down. we will honor and remember the life of former south african president, nelson mandela. his death was not a surprise. he was in failing health for months since being admitted to the hospital six months ago. he is being laid to rest a week from sunday and today people are remembering him as a giant among men. one of the greatest heroes. he was a man in the mold of gandhi and martin luther king. a revolutionary who spent nearly a third of his life behind bars so his country would be free. flags have been lowered to half-staff in washington and all over the country. reaction has poured in from all corners from global leaders to activists to ordinary men and women remembering nelson mandela. >> our nation has lot of its greatest son. our people have lot of a father. >> let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the ark of the moral universe towards justice. >> thank you for the gift. >> what an extroerdary and inspiring man else in an mandela was. >> going from being in prison on the list of many nations and b
today at nelson mandela's long journey. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. we further explore mandela's legacy. tonight, how south africa was forever changed by the man they called "father." >> to many people nelson mandela does represent the kind of more all center an a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. >> woodruff: back in the u.s., paul solman digs into today's jobs report, which points to strong gains in hiring and a five-year low in the unemployment rate. and mark shields and david brooks are here. they reflect on mandela's life and the rest of the week's news. those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made
time to come. >> south africa beginnings a week of ser -- ceremonies honouring nelson mandela. crowds left flowers, photographs and balloons outside nelson mandela's home in johannesburg. a memorial service will be held on tuesday with president obama, george w. bush, and jimmy carter. the man defending nelson mandela's yisent is also speaking out. mike hanna sat with him to talk about the unique relationship. >> there was an excessive part of the government that get-nelson mandela in gaol, and he served under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a
and the world is saying good-bye to nelson mandela and my conversation with maya angelou and gary player about the power to inspire people to imagine a better world and make it real. and later, you'll meet a man who spent 18 years in prison and came close to being executed for a murder he didn't commit despite evidence he didn't do it. >>> we begin tonight with breaking news of freakish and dangerous weather pattern that made it possible to experience a 105 degree swing from miami where it was 80 to montana where it was minus five. super cold rain is falling, freezing and coating a big chunk of the country in misery and y mayham. >> reporter: two days ago here in arkansas, the state was reaching near record high temperatures, 75 degrees on wednesday. today, try 26 and a dangerous layer of ice coating the roads, cars spun out and power lines weighed down with the frozen rain. >> the biggest problem we got right now, no traffic on the road. therefore no traffic when we put the salt and sand down, sleet come down and sit on top of it and sit there, and until there's really stop, i don't think w
after nelson mandela was released it from prison in 1990, he came on a tour to the united states to raise funds here, to raise further support here for the anti-apartheid cause, but also to say thank you to americans who had supported him and supported south africans in their fight to end apartheid. nelson mandela has been a household name this this country and around the world for decades. but with his death now at the age of 95, the details of what he did, of how he became one of the most famous people on earth, one of the greatest leaders of the century, it is such an astonishing and surprising story. it is as if you are hearing of this man for the first time when you hear the details of how he -- of how he became who he became. lester holt and us here at msnbc have put together it this explanation, this chronicle of the drama of nelson mandela's life. watch. [ speaking foreign language ] >> reporter: a savior to his people. >> he was the man who recognized the need to stand up and devote yourself entirely to the str strugg struggle. >> reporter: persecuted under a form of rep
i think i can handle that. i think that will be all right for me >>> this sunday, nelson madikizela-mandelman dedela. a special person whose world course changed world events. >> he was a president that embodied that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and for
former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning,
nelson mandela. i am mark crumpton. that is it for bottom line. have a great weekend. i will see you next time. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." >> we begin our coverage of the death of nelson mandela with a -- the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. him a namegave meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher in nelson. at 23.d to johannesburg he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in in infamous massacre. men alike came to believe the only reef force -- mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and a governmentgainst whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his life on island, the alcatraz of south africa. a fellow prisoner said mandela never
of the death of nelson mandela with the cbs evening news. >> he was born july 18, 1918. his mother gave him a name meaning "troublemaker," but later a school teacher in nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 23. he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940's, devoting himself to peacefully ending apartheid. then in 1960, peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in the infamous massacre. mandela came to believe then that the only recourse was violence. >> it is futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people. >> he was arrested and sentenced to life for sabotage and conspiracy. he served most of his life on robben island, the alcatraz of south africa. a fellow prisoner said mandela never let his spirit die. >> he accepted that he may not live to see the victory. but he did not doubt that the freedom struggle would triumph. >> mandela was imprisoned for 27 years. on february 11, 1990, at the a
>> schieffer: welcome back to "face the nation" page two. we will have a lot more on nelson mandela in just a moment. but there is some breaking news this morning on two fronts, afghanistan and iran. we want to go first to liz palmer who is just arrived in tehran. >> the first big milestone in the post geneva era of nuclear cooperation between iran and the west have been passed, bob. there is a highly controversial reactor outside of tehran which could in the end produce plutonium which could be used for a bomb. it's been off limits to the international agency inspectors, but today they were allowed access to the site. i should stress that this deal, this cooperative deal is not universally popular here in iran. the president gave a big speech at a university yesterday and he was heckled by hardliners who really feel as if his reformist government has sold out. he was also heckled by students who want more reforms, political and economic and they want them faster. which really underlines how he is going to have to tread a very clever, diplomatic path from here on in. >> schi
their own sort of memories of nelson mandela. we'll have more on this on "morning joe" which starts right now. ♪ ordinary love >> i build a society in which all both black and white can walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured of their right to human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> it would have been groundbreaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but nelson mandela was so much more. not only to his own country but to people the world over. the freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba, as he was known, sacrificed 25 years of his life in prison so that his countrymen might be free from the bonds of apartheid. >> your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. i, therefore, place in the remaining years of my life in your hands. >> when he was released from prison he was greeted by a crowd black and white and his plight inspired a young college student who would change history himself. >> i'm one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very fir
baldwin. the news is now. as the world mourns an icon, washington didn't always see nelson mandela as a saint. >>> america's unemployment rate drops, but will conservatives give president obama credit? >>> plus -- ♪ whiskey river >> willie nelson pugglled out oa gig at sea world after cnn's explosive film on killer whales. >> and when twitter bikes and critics sting. carrie underwood's version of a classic hits a nerve. >>> we have a lot to talk about here on this friday. i'm brooke baldwin. thank you so much for joining me. let's begin with this dangerous and deadly winter storm affecting millions of you all across the nation today. this freezing storm hitting from texas, all the way up to new york, you see the map here. the system causing flight cancellations, dangerous driving conditions, and now deaths. three adults have died in car accidents in both oklahoma and texas as a result of this storm system that you're looking at here. and in arkansas, one man died after a tree fell on his camper during the freezing rain. you know, ice can bring down the tree limbs and power lines
time, nelson mandela, people who were touched by nelson mandela are telling the story. robert joined the flight cooks lane. fromre than 8000 miles washington dc is where he lived his life, but we found his impact surpassing the distance as many remembered. >> the memories of nelson mandela are poignant. he loved people. learned lessons of a life lived at peace. message.is this he implanted, live your light. flowers outside the south african embassy. many are traumatized. the former u.s. ambassador says that nelson mandela was more than a head of state. >> that kind of man comes around once in a century. is, if he or she comes around at all. expatriates living in washington dc recalls nelson mandela positive it -- nelson mandela's last visit. >> people were crying. homeland, they paid respects to the man credited with uniting the nation. washingtonians are pouring out their hearts. to send to the mandela family, why shouldn't we, in the spirit that he stood for, give opportunities to everyone. >> south african will have a national day of prayer. nelson mandela will be laid to rest in
and reflection in south africa, beginning of a week of ceremonies and observances to honor the memory of nelson mandela. his death this past thursday saddened people all over the world and remind us how much he accomplished against such daunting odds. martha teichner will be reporting our cover story. >> he was to post apartheid south africa what george washington was to us, the father of his nation. >> there is time for the healing of the wound has come. >> he bore no grudges in spite of spending 27 years in prison. he went in a revolutionary and came out a statesman who spent the rest of his life reconciling white and black in a country where the racial divide was a chasm. later this sunday morning, what made nelson mandela a great man. >> osgood: we will consider mandela's place among the greats of history. and then turn to the manner of centuries beneath the square, a symbol of the freemasons, just who the masons are and who, what they do are one of the mysteries mo rocca will investigate. >> it is the world's oldest fraternity known for its rituals symbols and secrecy. >> what would happen
. outside his home in south africa. a spontaneous tribute to nelson mandela, how he changed that country and beyond. a step in the right direction for the u.s. economy, a new report reveals the job picture is rienthing and unmroement is falling. a severe wind and ice storm is moving east. hundreds of thousands are without power, and travel problems are building. ♪ >>> in south africa and around the world people are k looking at the legacy of nelson mandela. meanwhile funeral plans are ama and the first lady will be there to pay their respects. here are some of the details of what is to come. on tuesday decemb10th an official public memorial will be held in johannesberg. his body will lay in state for three days. the memorial's culminate with a state funeral. finally, mandela will be buried on sunday december 15th. >> reporter: tributes are being paid and prayers made for the icon. and now the world can officially say good-bye to nelsonela on december 10th which will be the official memorial service. and then for the following three days his remains will lay in state. but before then so
begins its farewell to legendary freedom fighter nelson mandela with a day of prayer and reflection. >>> and brace yourself. scenes like this are happening across the country today. >>> increasing tensions in asia, south korea has declared an expanded air defense zone that overlaps with once announced last month by china. it includes a strategic area disputed by the two countries. al jazeera's terry faucet reports. >> it may be about lines in the air but extend over land and sea. this is what south korea called the submerged rocky reef with a scientific research station and under the very obvious de facto control. the strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seoul as part of their exclusive economic zones. now south korea has asserted its rights in the air above. >> translator: the new korean air space defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight information region, which does not overlap with neighboring countries. this modified zone includes the air space over ioto waters. >> it's two weeks after china's surprise extension of t
. >>> world leaders now travel to go south africa. they're there to attend the memorial for nelson mandela. >>> and americans around the country are digging out following this latest blast of ice and snow. >> battle over the budget congress on the verge of a new spending deal as lawmakers spe e the bill before leaving for the holidays. it contains some things that the house does not like. >> this is it for this session this year. they're off for the holidays whether the farm deal is not, whether the budget is done or not. whether a whole host of items are normally no brainers for congress. they're having trouble, as you might imagine, as is in surprise getting it done. you heard of a grand bargain. this isn't even a baby grand bargain. this is keeping the music playing to keep the government from shutting down. this deal that has not yet been inked that is likely to come as we understand has done everything but reach very far. provides a framework by which congress can come back in january and pass those spending bills and avoid another catastrophe. over the weekend we heard dick durban, n
>>> happening now, south africa and the world prepare for the funeral of nelson mandela. we're there live with new information. >>> plus, clinton honors mandela. the former president shares very personal stories about his friend and his hero. he says the south african leader's advice helped him get through one of his darkest hours. stand by for my one-on-one interview. >>> plus, breaking news. a snow and ice emergency. a deadly winter storm is causing havoc on the roads and in the skies across america. we're tracking the danger as the deep freeze moves east and a new storm develops out west. >>> and a big jump in jobs. does president obama deserve credit for improving the u.s. economy after a surprisingly strong employment report? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> a ten-day mourning period is under way for one of the most influential leaders of our time. we're learning more about the final tributes to nelson mandela. stand by for that, and for my special conversation with the former president, bill clinton. he reveals a time when he and the south african
minister david cameron and members offer their tributes to former south african president nelson mandela who died last week. after that we'll be live at the american enterprise stews for financial -- institute. they'll be meeting to discuss implementation of the dodd-frank financial regulation law. and later, the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern for general speeches followed later with more debate on the annual legislation authorizing defense programs and debate and a roll call vote on a judicial nomination. >> representatives from iran and six world powers will meet in vienna this week for the next round of talks concerning iran's nuclear program. we'll have analysis of the ongoing negotiations at an event hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. speakers include former national security adviser brzezinski and new york times columnist tom friedman. cbs news "face the nation" anchor bob schieffer will moderate the event. that gets underway at 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span3. >> next, a look at the future of the republican party from political strategist and cnn con
>> welcome to the program. we begin this evening with the news that came this evening, nelson mandela has died at age 95. here is the president of the united states. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela chose a statement from the dock saying i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i've cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human being that any of us will know in the short time on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner
and the world reacts to the passing of nelson mandela. >> she is trying to sign up for obamacare but the web site won't let her saying her husband is in jail. one problem. that's not true. what the government is asking her to do now. >> they are scaring sense into middle schoolers who are out of control. >> you could hit somebody. you think it is freaking funny. ? >> now police are the ones in it trouble. fox friends first starts right now. -- "fox & friends first" starts right now. >> let's get right to the fox news alert for you. the world mourning the death of former south african president nelson mandela. here's a look at live pictures from outside his home. earlier hundreds of people sang gospel songs paying tribute to the leader who inspired the world to hope. ♪ >> jonathan hunt takes a look back at nelson mandela's extraordinary life. >> when nelson mandela walked free from prison on february the 11th, 1990, he knew as did the rest of the world, that white domination in south africa was about to end. he fought apartheid since the introduction in south africa in 1948 campaigning peac
to start on sunday. >>> tonight the world is mourning the loss of a freedom icon, nelson mandela being remembered as a leader who fought against apartheid and then went on to lead his country and inspire the world. >> president obama, first lady michelle obama, the clintons, oprah will all join world leaders for mandela's state funeral next sunday. this sunday will be a national day of prayer and reflection in south africa. tuesday will be the official public memorial. here in the u.s. the president did order flags to fly at half staff until sunday in honor of the former south african president. >>> the most visual outpouring of grief and celebration of his life is taking place outside mandela's home in a suburb of johannesburg. alphonso van marsh is there. >> reporter: people streamed down the streets toward nelson mandela's johannesburg home singing songs of praise, prayer and freedom. they gathered to pay tribute to the former south african president who died at 95 surrounded by family not far from here. this man says he's not mourning. >> i get to celebrate his life. we cry among
>>> for now, let us pause and give thanks to the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the bar towards justice. >>> south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95 leaving the country in mourning. >> our nation has lost its greatest -- our people have lost a father. >> elsewhere, the fed's richard bishop blames lawmakers for holding back the recovery ahead of what is expected to be a weaker payroll number in the u.s. economy. >>> germany's central bank raises its 2014 growth target for europe's largest economy as evidence shows demand from within the eurozone is finally picking up. >>> deutsche bank is to close its commodity business mainly in london and new york. display you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> a former south african president nelson mandela passed away last night at the age of 95. world leaders have been sending message messages of mourning for the leader. >> he is now resting. he is now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son our people have lost a fat
. >> nelson mandela, speaking after his release from 27 years in prison in south africa. his conviction, his courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching li
blazers, taking different approaches to change their industry and the world. nelson mandela certainly changing the world, the legacy he left the hide. plus, ted williams, known as " the kid" and "the splendid splinter" one of baseball's all-time greats. and the kid who may become the next warren buffett. all of that and more over the next hour. first, let's go to the headlines from our radio cohost carol massar. a five-&p 500 snapping day slide, gaining more than one percent, after better than expected u.s. jobs reports. dropped toyment rate a five-year low, payroll with 203,000 jobs added. sears is looking to spin off its lands end unit which has remained profitable despite the company struggles. and there was much glitz and glamour for today's world cup draw. rizzo will faced mexico, -- brazil will face mexico, cameroon, and portugal. those are some of the top headlines. massar. you, carol the world mourns the loss of one of its great leaders. nelson mandela emerged from 27 years in prison to become south africa's first elected black president, dying yesterday at the age of 95. the
>> rose: welcome to the program, tonight we remember nelson mandela, who died in south africa at age 95, joining me the former mayor of new york, david dinkins, the former editor of time magazine who wrote a biography on nelson mandela, stengel and his long time friend, jerry inzerillo. >> it was his genetic endowment what he learned in that moment of time. the great walter zulu who was really his mentor once told me a lovely story when young nelson mandela who first came to johannesburg to study law walked into zulu ice real estate office in soweto we were just trying to become a mass movement and one day a mass leader walked into my office. >> rose: also part of this program, a conversation with nelson mandela which took place here on this program in 1993. >> and the lesson is that the method of the people, the method of political method to be used, part determined by the oppressor himself, if the oppres oppressos peaceful means, we will never result to violence. it is when the oppressor in addition to repressive policies uses violence that the oppress have had no alternati
belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela. revolutionary, president, prisoner. and prophet. >> sometimes, it falls bonn a generation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, how he transformed our world. the lessons for our politics today. and a look back at his remarkable interview with ted koppel, just days after leaving prison. >> to spend 27 years, at the prime of your life, is a trag y tragedy. >> then -- >> we can't survive -- >> from wendy's to the white house. america debates inequality, growth, and fairness. we tackle it with two key senators, plus james carville and mary matalin join our powerhouse round table. right here, this sunday morning. >>> from abc news, "this week" with george stephanopoulos starts right now. >>> hello, again. in south africa today, preparations for the most massive memorial service in memory. pope francis, four american presidents, the dalai lama and dozens of world leaders will be there tuesday to pay tribute to a giant of our time. we'll reflect on nelson mandela this morning. first, let's go to chief foreign correspondent terry mo
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